Fens

There are two known category 3 fens located in the Mud Run Watershed. They are along Garrison Road and deserve the highest protections.  Read about the differences between wetlands and discover why the fens in Clark County are valuable community resources!

more fen info

Wetlands are lands covered by shallow water. Every wetland is unique due to its location and foundation. There are four main types of wetlands: marshes, swamps, bogs and fens.

  1. MARSHES are not always full of water but contain fresh water, salt water or a combination of both.
  2. SWAMPS form in floodplains or other areas with bad drainage and always have wet soil or standing water.  (SWAMPS HAVE TREES AND MARSHES DON’T!)
  3. BOGS only contain fresh water because they are fed by rain and exist in northern climates inside lake basins with poor drainage. The ground in a bog feels like a squishy sponge and is covered by peat, which is decaying plant matter.
  4. FENS also contain only fresh water because they are fed by groundwater. These types of wetlands are the rarest and contain more plant and animal species than any other wetlands.

 

Wetlands cover around 6% of the Earth, but in the last few decades, the United States alone has lost half of its wetlands. About 30% of the threatened or endangered species living in the United States live exclusively in wetland habitats. Protecting these areas help animals and provide important resources for people too!

Wetland ecosystems benefit people, plants and animals in many ways. They are incredibly productive, are home to diverse species and protect water. Wetlands:

  1.  Provide a variety of food sources to support the food chain’
  2. Naturally improve water quality
  3. Promote diversity of life
  4. Protect against flood damage

INFORMATION GATHERED FROM THE FOLLOWING WEBSITES: https://kids.lovetoknow.com/wiki/Wetlands_for_Kids

https://www.epa.gov/wetlands/classification-and-types-wetlands#fens

TheThe Mud Run Conservancy is dedicated to the well-being of the Mud Run Watershed. This valuable resource encompasses over 20 miles of waterways and includes the Mud Run Creek, Clear Creek, a major tributary, two minor tributaries, fens, wetlands and dozens of natural springs.